Tate Britain will be examining the work of the British artist Frank Auerbach when the exhibition opens early next month.

Auerbach is best known for his vibrant and inventive paintings, a selection of which will be on display in this latest exhibition of his work. He is often compared with the likes of Francis Bacon and Lucien Freud thanks to his powerful and revolutionary work.

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Frank Auerbach (b 1931),Hampstead Road, High Summer 2010, private collection. © Frank Auerbach, courtesy Marlborough Fine Art.

Tate Britain’s exhibition will feature paintings and drawings from the 1950’s up until the present day and offers new insights into his work – with the artist himself suggesting the selection of the first six galleries.

With the level of depth, texture and sense of space that Auerbach conveys in his paintings, the visitor will experience art in a completely different way, which in turn makes it a unique experience.

For the last 50 years, Auerbach has worked (and lived) in the same part of London: Camden Town – an area that has become one of the major subjects for his work. Painting all year round, he continues to discard what he does and scrap back the surface of a canvas to start and re-start the painting process. By doing this daily, he is able to then keep refreshing the work until one day a painting emerges in a matter of hours.

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Frank Auerbach (b 1931),Head of William Feaver 2003. Collection of Gina and Stuart Peterson.© Frank Auerbach, courtesy Marlborough Fine.

The exhibition is curated by Catherine Lampert, who has not only been the selector for the final two rooms, but has a long and established working relationship with Frank Auerbach, having sat for him in his studio every week for 37 years.

But the point of the display is to show that although Auerbach continues to paint the same sitters and returns to specific London locations, each painting has its own merits and shouldn’t be judged by style or period.

Frank Auerbach said: “This part of London is my world. I’ve been wandering around these streets for so long that I’ve become attached to them and as fond of them as people are to their pets”.

Frank Auerbach opens at Tate Britain on the 9th October and will be on display until the 13th March 2016. 

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