Open to the public from today (1st June), Tate Modern looks at the influence of Bhupen Khakhar as a key figure in modern Indian art. But what have critics been saying about the exhibition? 

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Tate Modern. 

The Telegraph: Mark Hudson wrote: “It draws you in not only through the sheer liveliness of the work, but because Khakhar’s artistic impulses weren’t at heart intellectual or political, but personal and emotional.”

The Guardian: * Jonathan Jones wasn’t impressed saying simply: “this show is a waste of space.”

Londonist: **** Tabish Khan felt differently, commenting: “The paintings themselves are visually pleasing, but it’s the personal touches and references to Khakhar’s own experiences which elevates his work.”

The Upcoming: *** Anna Souter was mildly pleased saying: “Striking and provocative as several of Bhupen Khakhar’s paintings undoubtedly are, nevertheless there’s a feeling running through the show that they might not quite be interesting enough to warrant an entire retrospective at Tate Modern.”

Culture Whisper: *** “The Tate are right to dedicate an exhibition to a non-Western artist. But they have failed to frame it adequately: it cries out for context.”

Evening Standard: *** Ben Luke found that: “at his best Khakhar stirs the intellect and the senses. ”

The exhibition brings together over five decades of the artist’s work, including major works on canvas, luminous watercolour paintings and experimental ceramics.

Tate acquired the paining that this exhibition is titled after You Can’t Please All (1981) in 1996.

Bhupen Khakhar: You Can’t Please All is on display until the 6th November 2016. For more information and to book tickets visit: http://www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-modern/exhibition/bhupen-khakhar

 

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