The gallery will present exhibitions on Maíno, Michelangelo, Chris Ofili, Giovanni da Rimini and Van Eyck throughout 2017. 

The latest programme of exhibitions will start with Maíno’s Adorations: Heaven on Earth, running at the London gallery from the 28th September until the 29th January 2017. Focusing on two pieces of art by the Spanish artist that haven’t been seen in the UK before, the display runs in concurrence with the Beyond Caravaggio exhibition – showcasing how ‘The Adoration of the Shepherds’ and ‘The Adoration of the Kings’ illustrate Caravaggio’s extended influence across Europe.

Meanwhile, from the 7th December until the 26th March 2017, the gallery focuses on Australia in Australia’s Impressionists. This display will examine the country’s Impressionist movement through four major exponents of Impressionism – Tom Roberts , Arthur Streeton, Charles Conder and John Peter Russell.

This will then be followed by Cagnacci’s Repentant Magdalene running from the 15th February to the 21st May 2017. This is the first time that Cagnacci’s masterpiece will be displayed in the UK for thirty years, allowing the public an  opportunity to appreciate the greatest work of art that the artist created.

The gallery will then examine the artistic relationship between two great Renaissance masters, Sebastiano del Piombo and Michelangelo, from the 1510s through to the 1540s in the exhibition Michelangelo| Sebastiano: A Meeting of Minds  (15th March to the 25th June 2017).

From the 26th April Turner Prize-Winning artist Chris Ofili will unveil a new work which sees him creating his first tapestry, in Chris Ofili: Weaving Magic. The piece will be on display until the 28th August 2017.

Meanwhile, from the 14th June until the 8th October, the National Gallery will present Giovanni da Rimini: An Early 14th Century Masterpiece Reunited . This will see the artist’s Scenes from the Lives of the Virgin and other Saints (purchased by the national Gallery last year) displayed alongside  loans including works by artists working in Rimini in the early 14th century.

Visitors will then get an opportunity to discover how van Eyck’s ‘Arnolfini Portrait’ was one of the beacons by which the Pre-Raphaelites forged a radical new style of painting. Reflections:Van Eyck and the Pre-Raphaelites will run from 4th October until the 2nd April 2018. It will bring together for the first time the ‘Arnolfini Portrait’ with paintings from the Tate collection and loans from other museums.

The final exhibition to be announced for 2017 is Monochrome: Painting in Black and White , which will run from the 1st November until the 18th February 2018. This display will explore the tradition of painting in black and white and the fascination of doing so by artists. It will present a series of case studies that investigate where and when grisaille painting was used and to what effect.

 

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