Jonathan Pryce and Eileen Atkins star in Christopher Hampton’s adaptation of Florian Zeller’s play at the Wyndham’s Theatre. Love London Love Culture rounds up the reviews… 

40389_full

The Guardian: **** “What I can say for certain is that Zeller’s play penetrates the memory long after one has left the theatre.”

WhatsOnStage: *** “What no one could argue with is the superb quality of the performances. Jonathan Pryce brings a brilliantly balanced mix of bewilderment and authority to Andre, as he struggles to cope with his two daughters’ bright ideas about what’s best for him.”

Time Out: **** “Pryce grinds his jaw and picks at his clothes like a man whose anger is on the tip of his tongue, if he could remember it. Atkins, who could probably win a gold medal for throwing shade, imbues Madeleine with strength and dry wit. Together, they’re devastating. They break your heart in the quietest, mundane moments.”

Evening Standard: **** “There were sniffles at the end of Jonathan Kent’s elegant production, which jangles our nerves so sufficiently that even the most innocuous event comes to seem portentous.”

The Stage: **** ” It resists emotional excess. It’s frustratingly polite and theatrically static. But it pinpoints that sense of unsteadiness that comes from seeing a once formidable parent diminished by age, the pain of the things left unsaid, the arguments unresolved, and it has a disorientating, melancholic quality that’s genuinely moving.”

London Theatre1: ***** ” although Pryce and Atkins are a tender complement as a long-wedded couple, it is ultimately Atkins embodiment of Madeleine that reaches the pinnacle of greatness. See this play for many reasons but especially for Atkins who may be the finest actor in contemporary theatre.”

London Theatre.co.uk: *** “There’s brittleness as well as bitterness here, but not an altogether satisfying sense of dramatic momentum. As with Harold Pinter’s intense marital drama Old Times, there’s a fractured, displaced quality here that’s open to multiple interpretations. Some may enjoy trying to put it together; others, like me, are left frustrated, while still admiring the cool atmosphere and gorgeous performances of the cast.”

Stage Review: **** “Director Jonathan Kent has created an evocative and moving drama which asks as many questions as it answers.”

Mature Times: “Since there is so much to work out whilst you are in the theatre and plenty to discuss when you come out of the theatre, I am certain there are going to be lots of people who will be eager to see the play again.”

British Theatre.com: **** “See this for acting of the highest quality, a lighting design that pulses with the script, and Jonathan Kent’s tender direction.”

British Theatre Guide: “On this occasion, underpinned by the expert assistance of director Jonathan Kent working with a cast to die for, this talented French playwright has produced what is undoubtedly his strongest piece of writing to reach London since The Father.” 

Hollywood Reporter: “The 84-year-old Atkins is the driving force here, throwing bitchy shade and dropping sporadic F-bombs with palpable relish. Her razor-sharp performance wipes the floor with everyone else, even Pryce’s finely calibrated, Lear-like André.”

The Upcoming: **** “Though at first, this production is not easily absorbed – playing as it does with the fog of the mind – The Height of the Storm leaves us with a lasting bittersweet taste, the convoluted writing fortunately finding a good balance with the compelling acting.”

The Height of the Storm continues to play at the Wyndham’s Theatre until the 1st December. To book tickets visit: https://lovelondonloveculture.tixuk.com/london-theatre/plays/the-height-of-the-storm

 

Advertisements