The British Museum presents a new display of Rembrandt’s work to  mark the 350th anniversary of the artist’s death. 

Rembrandt van Rijn,
1606–1669.
Young woman sleeping (Hendrickje Stoffels?), around
1654.
© the Trustees of the British Museum

On display from the 7th February, this new exhibition will highlight a selection of drawings and prints by Rembrandt van Rijn (1606-1669) that
provide an insight into the Dutch artist’s development an experimentation.

Bringing together over sixty works, Rembrandt: Thinking on Paper will showcase the way in which Rembrandt worked purely on paper. The British Museum examines Rembrandt’s creative process on paper by bringing together related subjects from throughout his life.

At the heart of the exhibition is his Young woman sleeping (Hendrickje Stoffels?) (c.1654), an evocative brush drawing of the woman thought to be Rembrandt’s late lover caught in an intimate moment of rest. His other depictions of women to be included in this exhibition are Rembrandt’s early portrait of his wife Saskia ill in bed, while Reclining female nude (1658) is on display for the very first time.

There will also be a section in the display that concentrates on the artist’s religious works, in particular focusing on his shift from Baroque drama to quiet introspection. The works featured in this part of the exhibition will include Raising of Lazarus (c.1632), Three Crosses (1653) and Ecce Homo (1655).

As one of the most beloved artists in the world, this exhibition is a chance for visitors to discover more about the technical detail and creativity that went into Rembrandt’s work.

Rembrandt: Thinking on Paper will be on display at the British Museum  from the 7th February until the 4th August. 

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