LLLC’s Emma Clarendon chatted to the actresses about starring in Eggs at the Tristan Bates Theatre.

Could you explain a bit more about what eggs is about?

Emily: Eggs is a story based around two female friends in their mid-twenties. The women are polar opposites in personality, one is climbing the corporate ladder – feeling the societal pressure of settling down, starting a family, meeting a husband, progressing in her career. The other girl is a lot more chaotic, she seems unstable, she has no clarity and is completely reckless. However flawed their friendship may seem it is the one thing that holds them together. The writing is completely universal, it relates to all women but our version especially is a fabulous representation of northern female voices.

What were your initial impressions of Florence Keith Roach’s play when you first read it? 

Lauren: I was sat in my bed reading the play and I could not stop laughing. There were so many moments when I just wanted to shout “This is me” or “That has happened to me”. The topics were extremely relatable. I fell in love with both of the girls, and their flaws. They were real, with problems and various highs and lows. I was looking for a play that spoke to me and this one certainly did. Girl two read as a tough career driven woman, but I saw her vulnerability and thats what made me like her even more.

Emily:When I first read the play I immediately connected to the writing. I thought it was clever, eloquent but exceptionally funny. It was very warm and relatable. Both characters jumped out of the page and I was able to truly imagine what these women were like. However, honestly, I didn’t like my character to start off with. I found her funny but irritating. So it took a little bit of work to start liking her. I think it was because we have a lot of similarities which I was in denial about.

Is there anything in the play that resonated with you personally?

Emily: The play is packed full of things that resonated with both of us. My character, Girl One goes through some weighty experiences which have either happened to me personally or friends of mine. This made the rehearsal process emotional at times but very beneficial. My character’s coping mechanisms and defensiveness felt real for me. I was able to sympathise with her and understand how overwhelming pressures in society can be.

Lauren: For me, It brought out that motherly instinct in me and that maternal quality that I hadn’t noticed was something that is a part of who I am as a person. Throughout the rehearsal process , I learnt so much about myself. When it came to my character getting her heart broken, that initial moment of gut instinct, and how we should not ignore how we feel in moments of doubt , that really resonated with me.

Do you think in this era of social media and obsession with celebrities it is more difficult to find out who we really are and what we stand for? 

Lauren: For me personally, I think social media is a dangerous place at times. It is so easy to find yourself looking or seeking validation off people who have no impact on your life. I think if anything its made me realise my passions, acting and making good quality theatre. Its important that we don’t stay stuck on our phones and find a way to communicate each other, that is the only way we can truly understand one another.

Emily: Absolutely, we are always subconsciously comparing ourselves with strangers. It is normal to feel lost or unsure with moments of our life but these are the exciting bits which shape us. Knowing your own mind comes with time and experiences. It is easy to imagine someone else’s journey in life is more exciting or more successful than yours when you only see the best bits. So instead of aiming for the end goal we should try and enjoy our own individual journey which is why I believe it is so important to ground yourself with people you trust and who bring out the best version of you.

If people are thinking about coming along to the Tristan Bates Theatre to see the show – why should they in your opinion? 

Emily: It is an hour of making up and breaking up. There’ll be tears, laughter, rowing and lots of sex talk all complimented by the best 90’s female ballads. It’s an hour of nostalgia where you leave wanting to give your best mate a hug. 

Lauren: It is a celebrate of women. It is honest, blunt and as brash as can be. You are welcomed into the world of female, men included , we are not locking anyone out. We are showing ourselves at our most vulnerable.

By Emma Clarendon

Eggs will play at the Tristan Bates Theatre from the 29th April until the 4th May.

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