Following a successful run in London, Jamie Lloyd’s production of Harold Pinter’s play has officially opened on Broadway. Love London Love Culture rounds up the reviews.

(c) Marc Brenner.

Variety: “Thanks to the precision of Lloyd’s direction, our eyes are always focused on the proper bit of minimalist action – a quick sideways glance, a casual crossing of the legs – while our heads are occupied with Pinter’s layered thoughts. Of all Pinter’s often-puzzling work, this play is the one that clearly speaks to you, thinks for you, and may even feel for you.”

Entertainment Weekly: “A production this minimalist depends on its performances. Hiddleston’s turn has the restraint and winning edge of a poker sharp. Robert often knows more than either his friend or wife suspects, giving him a power and calm unusual in a cuckolded husband; Hiddleston wields that advantage with a chilling smile. However, in the moment when his suspicions about his wife are confirmed, there is real emotion, teary eyes and all.”

Deadline: “Aching, wistful and wounding, the director’s staging of Betrayal presents three friends and lovers trapped in an undoing of their own making, their inevitable self-destruction no less powerful for showing itself before the happier days.”

Vogue.com: “With Hiddleston, the production also arrives with considerable star power behind it, but the tone of the Broadway Betrayal is anything but glitzy. This is pure Pinter.”

The Wrap: “Never do these design elements or Lloyd’s direction give any of these characters the chance to escape from each other. It’s the problem with being in an extramarital relationship: There’s never only two people in bed at the same time. Those other not-present partners have a way of hovering over the bed sheets. Lloyd’s direction puts that crowded predicament in boldface.”

The New York Times: “Mr. Lloyd’s interpretation balances surface elegance with an aching profundity, so that “Betrayal” becomes less about the anguish of love than of life itself.”

Hollywood Reporter: “Lloyd and his actors illuminate a glimmering darkness in the drama, a deeper well of sorrows that linger in the air even after the cast take their bows.”

Betrayal continues to play at the Bernard B. Jacobs Theater until the 8th December. Book tickets here.

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