Following a successful run at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe in 2018, Adam Lazarus’s play will make its London debut next year at the Battersea Arts Centre.

(c) Alejandro Santiago.

Directed by Ann-Marie Kerr, Adam Lazarus’s play is a dark satire that confronts toxic masculinity head on as seen through the eyes of an engaging and troubled man.

Through his powerful account of fatherhood, violence and love, we come to recognize the ingrained misogyny we see everywhere — within society, within our communities, and perhaps, for some of us, within ourselves.

Playing at the Battersea Arts Centre from the 3rd to the 28th March 2020, Daughter raises questions of culpability and complicity, while examining  the subtle and not-so-subtle ways misogyny is condoned and encouraged in society. 

The production sees Adam Lazarus playing the Father who is an affable everyman; a figure for our amusement, dismay and judgement. The birth of his daughter is a turning point in his life’s journey thus far, and as he looks back at his past and recent behaviour, troubled, violent and shameful secrets start to burst through. It is from his powerful account of violence and searing remorse that audiences can recognise the ingrained misogyny we see everywhere — within society and within our communities.

Meanwhile, the creative team for the production includes: lighting design by Michelle Ramsay and sound design by Richard Feren.

Daughter will play at the Battersea Arts Centre from the 3rd to the 28th March.

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