Emma Clarendon selects her favourite exhibitions of 2019….

Troy: Myth and Reality, British Museum: in terms of sheer scale and detail, this British Museum exhibition is impressive from start to finish. Chronicling all of the important elements of the history and story of Troy to explore whether this city actually existed, this display is engaging and fascinating throughout – with its impressive number of objects and works of art on display. Well worth a visit while you can.

Christian Dior: Designer of Dreams, Victoria and Albert Museum: the V&A is renowned for its major fashion exhibitions and this one took it to a whole new level in terms of style and presentation. Taking a dazzling look at Dior’s fashion legacy this was one of the museum’s successful exhibitions to date.

Victoria: Woman and Crown, Kensington Palace: this year marked the 200th anniversary since the birth of Queen Victoria. To celebrate, her childhood home Kensington Palace has presented an exhibition that compares and contrasts her private and and public personas from wife and mother to being Queen and how she managed to cope with all roles. Fascinating and insightful – it offered a new perspective on her life.

Mandela: The Official Exhibition, 26 Leake Street Gallery: the year began with this major worldwide touring exhibition devoted to the life of Nelson Mandela, exploring in more detail his struggles and dedication to his work as a world leader. Taking visitors from his childhood, his time in prison and beyond, this exhibition was brilliantly presented and left you with a deeper understanding of his legacy.

Masterplan 25: Iconic and Unseen Photographs of Oasis, h Club: ideal for those who love Oasis, this exhibition that focuses on their memorable album covers created by photographer Michael Spencer Jones offered new insight into the band as well as the techniques used to create these memorable images.

Edvard Munch: Love and Angst, British Museum: the museum’s other epic exhibition of the year exploring the work of the renowned artist, offered visitors a new opportunity to see his work in a different way – by focusing on his print work. Despite perhaps a slight feeling of chaos in the way in which it was presented, the exhibition reflected the artist’s style and technique perfectly.

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