Love London Love Culture rounds up the reviews for the Royal Academy’s major exhibition exploring the artist’s many different uses of paper.

Women at Their Toilette, Paris, winter 1937–38
© RMN-Grand Palais (Musée national Picasso-Paris) / Mathieu Rabeau.

The Guardian: ***** “While each section of the exhibition alights on a major theme – cubism and neo-classicism and surrealism, with Picasso’s relationship with Marie-Thérèse Walter, the war years and his later re-engagement with Manet and Delacroix – the pleasures of the exhibition are in individual works, in all their variety of touches and tempos.”

The Telegraph: ***** “As ideas for exhibitions go, “artist uses paper” is about as interesting and newsworthy as “man walks dog”. Yet Picasso and Paper – a colossal new exhibition of more than 300 works at the Royal Academy – is so full of surprises and delightful moments of frivolity and mischief that it confounds this assumption.”

Time Out: **** “The world really doesn’t need another Picasso show, but while one’s here, we might as well enjoy it for what it is: brilliant art by a genuine master. Bottoms up.”

Evening Standard: ***** “This big, magnificent exhibition explores his relationship with paper. But it’s hardly a limitation. Paper wasn’t just the obvious medium for his exquisite line drawings, his captivating powdery pink gouache, like Three Nudes, or his preparatory sketches for his great paintings or sculpture such as the haunting La Vie from the Blue period, also in the show.”

Londonist: **** “I came into this exhibition having seen plenty of work by Picasso, and wondering what new ideas it could possibly offer, and yet here I am, completely blown away by his unbounded creativity.”

The Times: **** ““I draw, like other people bite their nails,” said Picasso. And the paper he drew on could seduce him, he once explained to a friend. He would respond to the properties — and push the possibilities — of this material, as the latest show at the Royal Academy makes emphatically clear.”

Picasso and Paper is on display at the Royal Academy of Arts from the 25th January until the 13th April 2020.