With all of the galleries set to reopen on the 27th July, Tate has announced details of its 2021 exhibition programme.

Auguste Rodin, Study for The Thinker, 1881, Musée Rodin.

The Tate have announced its upcoming exhibition programme details for all four of its galleries for the next year. This is set to include solo exhibitions dedicated to the work of artists such as Philip Guston, Petrit Halilaj, Lubaina Himid, Yayoi Kusama, Paula RegoAuguste Rodin and Sophie Taeuber-Arp. The year will also see newly commissioned works by Heather PhillipsonEmily Speed and Anicka Yi, as well as landmark exhibitions exploring Britain’s relationship with the Caribbean and Hogarth’s depictions of 18th century life.

The spring programme will begin with a retrospective of America’s  Philip Guston (4th February- 31st May 2021) whose career spanned across 50 years and considered to be one of America’s greatest modern painters. This will then be followed by a chance to experience two of Yayoi Kusama’s Infinity Mirror Rooms, immersive installations that transport the viewer into the artist’s unique vision of endless reflections.

Heading into the summer, Tate Britain will present an exhibition devoted to the work of Paula Rego from the 16th June until the 24th October. As an artist who was considered influential in redefining figurative art in the UK and internationally, this exhibition will tell the artist’s own story. This will be displayed alongside Hope. Struggle. Change: Photographing Britain and the ​World 1945-79(12th May-26th September)bringing together 300 powerful documentary photographs that tell the story of modern Britain.

Tate Modern will celebrate two groundbreaking figures in modern art with major exhibitions. The EY Exhibition: The Making of Rodin will reveal Auguste Rodin as a radical artist, whose highly experimental works modelled in clay and plaster broke with century-long traditions and inaugurated a new age of sculpture. Sophie Taeuber-Arp will showcase the multidisciplinary work of one of the foremost abstract artists and designers of the 1920s and 30s, who challenged the boundaries between traditional crafts and modern art.

Tate Liverpool will also open a year-long free In Focus display of Lucian Freud’s paintings and prints. This will run alongside a major new project by artist Emily Speed, who was selected through Tate Liverpool’s inaugural Art North West open call. Tate St Ives will open a new exhibition by Kosovar artist Petrit Halilaj.

In the autumn, Anicka Yi’s Hyundai Commission for Tate Modern’s Turbine Hall will continue her ongoing exploration of the links between art and science and her use of unorthodox and experimental materials. Also at Tate Modern, a theatrical exhibition by the Turner Prize winning artist Lubaina Himid will include recent work alongside highlights from across her influential career.

Tate Britain will open two major group exhibitions exploring art’s connections to wider social and cultural history. Hogarth and Europe will show how 18th century urban life was captured by William Hogarth in London alongside his contemporaries in Paris, Amsterdam and Venice. The exhibition will bring to life a vivid world of opportunity and enlightenment as well as materialism and exploitation. Britain and the Caribbean will be a landmark group exhibition spanning half a century, celebrating artists from the Caribbean who made their home in Britain, alongside later British artists who have made work addressing Caribbean themes and heritage.

For more information about any of the exhibitions visit: https://www.tate.org.uk/