This experimental short film is suitably theatrical in style but needs a bit more clarity to make more sense.

Completely unlike anything else I have seen in lockdown, Chewboy Productions presents this sharp and short show that examines people’s relationship with isolation and the technological world we live in and investigates the things left in the dark to fester.

Written by Georgie Bailey, there really is an eeriness about The Zizz that makes the audience sit up and pay attention. It really highlights the impact of the digital world has on our own mental wellbeing – even more so during lockdown. A tv screen featuring words and expressions that don’t have meaning except for highlighting how our use of language changes when written down in a digital sense and can be have even more different interpretations than when spoken – leading to misunderstandings and dark thoughts when seen.

But the character who we see in this, Doz is trying to figure what he is supposed to do in life but is constantly being distracted by digital technology – which under these circumstances is a really valid point, with all our lives on hold for the time being. It highlights in a sharp and chilling way the power digital technology can take control our lives.

Directed by Lucy Betts, Georgie Bailey and Hal Darling, it is a very experimental and artistic piece that uses a huge variety of techniques to really highlight the character’s sense of isolation and being wrapped in a surreal digital world. It is a very frantic piece that uses elements of repetition to really enhance the sense of the feeling of “groundhog day” that we are all experiencing in our day to day life.

But while it is fascinating to watch, it feels as though the ideas and thoughts expressed could be expanded further with a bit more clarity. There are moments (probably on purpose) that feel disorientating and difficult to really understand.

From start to finish it has a feel of a horror film about it as Doz becomes increasingly lost in his thoughts and isolation from the outside world. It is a chilling and thought provoking piece.

Overall, The Zizz is not an easy piece to write about – there is a feeling that it will have a whole different layer of meaning to any individual who watches it. This being said it is impressively distinct in style and worth a watch for anyone who appreciates experimentation in digital arts.

By Emma Clarendon

The Zizz is available to watch until the 22nd February.

Rating: ⭐⭐⭐