This new exhibition will go on display from the 1st of December until the 10th April 2022.

(c)Takumi Ota Photography.

This new exhibition will explore the different perspectives on the world that windows offer us as well as considering the role of windows in disciplines such as architecture, film, craft manufacture, manga and motion.

Those visiting will be able to walk through a full-scale replica of the 17th century architectural plan of Yōsuitei teahouse in Kyoto – also known as the Jūsansōnoseki (13-window sitting room) – renowned for having the most windows among all existing teahouses.

Curated by the Tokyo-based Window Research Institute, an institution focused on the study, design, use and impact of windows, and leading architectural historian and critic Igarashi Taro, this free exhibition looks at the ways in which windows can frame our vision to give us unique perspectives on the world.

Themes covered in the exhibition are set to include: craft, film, manga, environment, storytelling and how we live now.

Artist Tsuda Michiko has created a window-themed installation allowing visitors to Japan House inside, and visitors on Kensington High Street and Derry Street outside, to interact with each other, distorting the boundaries between the streetscape and the interior. 

Talking about the exhibition Igarashi Taro, Director of the Windowology exhibition said: “Now more than ever, windows play a vital role in connecting us with each other and our wider communities. Allowing us to see the world outside as well as in, windows are intimately linked to our everyday lives and physical actions. The Japan House London exhibition presents an opportunity for us to introduce our work on Windowology research from Japan, and to showcase the wider cultural significance of the window across all cultures.”

Windowology: New Architectural Views from Japan will go on display from the 1st December until the 10th April 2022.