Tate has confirmed that exhibitions based on the work of artists such as Edward Burne-Jones, Anni Albers and Joan Jonas as part of its 2018 programme. 

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(c) Tate

The Tate has announced highlights of its 2018 programme for all four of its galleries, which will include exhibitions by figures across a range of disciplines including painting, performance, textiles, film and photography.

One of the first exhibitions to take place in 2018, will be a major exhibition looking at the work of author Virginia Woolf at Tate St Ives, where the author grew up. The display will run from January 2018 and will look at works of art and artist inspired by the author’s work.

Meanwhile, in London from the 28th February Tate Britain will present All Too Human: Bacon, Freud and a Century of Painting . The exhibition will concentrate on celebrating painters who found new ways to depict people places, feelings and relationships.

Tate Modern will present a major Picasso exhibition from the 8th March, concentrating on the work the artist produced during 1932, a year that was called his ‘year of wonders’. It was the year in which he created many of his most beloved works including portraits and drawings.

This display will be closely followed by an exhibition focusing on the work of Joan Jonas, opening on the 14th March. It will celebrate the artist’s work as a pioneer in performance art and why she has become one of the most highly regarded and influential artists working today.

Other exhibitions to expect at Tate Modern will include:  Into the Light Photography and Abstract Art and an exhibition devoted to the work of Anni Albers.

Meanwhile, Tate Britain will concentrate on Edward Burne-Jones in a landmark exhibition running from the 24th October. It will be the first major display of the artist’s work in 40 years, showcasing over 150 pieces of work in a variety of media.

Tate Liverpool will feature exhibitions such as a display devoted to the work of Egon Schiele as well as marking the 30th anniversary of the gallery.

 

 

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