REVIEW: Six, Arts Theatre

Funny, upbeat and quintessentially British – Six is the perfect mix of history and pop. Six is a pop concert starring the six Tudor Queens of King Henry VIII. It was written by Toby Marlow and Lucy Moss and details the lives of the women behind one of the most well known monarchs in British… Read More

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REVIEW: Bohemia, Black Cat Cabaret, Underbelly Festival

“Bohemia inspires genius, great art and madness.” At least that’s according to Miss Frisky, emcee of the Black Cat Cabaret. And it’s most certainly true as the circus cabaret act returns to the South Bank’s Spiegeltent, this time with their latest show, Bohemia, said to be their “most dark and daring theatrical spectacular to date.” … Read More

REVIEW: There is Nothing Like a Dame, Cadogan Hall

This first show from the newly formed Lambert Jackson Productions celebrated female characters from musicals – with the help of four vocally powerful West End stars.  It has to be said that if this show proved anything it is that female characters from musicals have had some of the most iconic songs to sing across… Read More

REVIEW: Homos, Or Everyone in America, Finborough Theatre

Intense, overpowering and heartfelt – Homos, Or Everyone In America welcomes you to the intimate relationship of a gay couple in New York. I wasn’t sure what to expect as I entered the tiny Finborough Theatre and noticed that the entire space was covered with sand, nor when I was hit by the distinct smell… Read More

REVIEW: Swan Lake, St Petersburg Ballet Theatre, London Coliseum

St Petersburg Ballet Theatre’s beautiful classical production really captures the fairytale element of the story – even if the ending lacks emotion and power.  What a beautiful, luxurious and classic production of Swan Lake this is. Every element of this production is handled with a great lightness of touch that really highlights the tenderness and… Read More

REVIEW: Notes on a Nervous Planet by Matt Haig

Love London Love Culture’s Kirsty Herrington discusses Matt Haig’s latest book on how to handle the world’s problems while looking after our mental health. Following the success of his memoir, Reasons to Stay Alive, which discussed his breakdown, depression and anxiety, Matt Haig is back, this time with more of a ‘how to’ guide which… Read More

REVIEW: The Rise and Fall of Little Voice, Park Theatre

Tom Latter’s production of Jim Cartwright’s tragic comedy captures the sense of isolation between mother and daughter well and is a perfect reminder that we should all use our voices more.  We have all got a part of ourselves that we keep private from the outside world – but in some cases it is a… Read More

REVIEW: The Greek Escape by Karen Swan

Karen Swan’s latest book is filled with plenty of glamour and intrigue with a hint of romance to create a story which simmers with tension throughout.  For anyone looking for an easy going but intriguing story that combines tragedy, heartache and corruption in one book could do a lot worse than reading this entertaining new… Read More

REVIEW: Spring Awakening, Stockwell Playhouse

Dean Johnson’s production of this sombre musical draws out mature performances from its cast – but you are left wondering if the story in fact makes for a good musical… (c) Eliza Wilmot. It is always a slight concern of mine seeing a bit of a detailed explanation of what a show is about in… Read More

REVIEW: Spiders, Tristan Bates Theatre

Love London Love Culture’s Kirsty Herrington reviews Spiders playing at the Tristan Bates Theatre as part of the Camden Fringe.  The title might suggest otherwise, but thankfully Spiders isn’t a stage version of 1980s film Arachnophobia. Although the play, performed at the Tristan Bates Theatre as part of the Camden Fringe, does refer to the… Read More